Disability Benefits – A Guide (Part I)

- by Becky Hall
A Guide to the Welfare System in the UK – Chapter 7 Part I

There are many disability benefits available. If you’re finding it hard to know which disability benefits you can claim, then you need to read this; your ultimate disability benefits guide.

A guide to Disability Benefits from Cashfloat A guide to Disability Benefits from Cashfloat

This is part 1 of the disability section of our guide to the UK welfare system. In this part we will mainly be looking at Employment and Support Allowance, Personal Independence Payment, Attendance Allowance and Universal Credit. These are the main benefits available to adults in the UK, who have an illness or a disability and are unable to work as a result. On top of that we will take a brief look at some miscellaneous benefits that disabled people in the UK can receive on top of the main benefits, such as VAT Relief, vehicle tax exemption and council tax reduction.

Part 2 of the disability section of our guide to the UK welfare system looks at disability benefits which will only be available to certain people, such as carers and parents who have a disabled child. You can read part 2 of this chapter here. It discusses Carer’s Allowance, Disability Living Allowance (for children under the age of 16), benefits if you were injured at work or have developed an illness because of your work, benefits for blind people and benefits for members of the armed forces.




There have been recent changes to disability benefits in the UK. Universal Credit has been introduced, new claimants over 16 no longer receive the Disability Living Allowance but qualify for the Personal Independence Payment instead and the eligibility criteria for Employment and Support Allowance has changed. If you are unable to work or if you can only work part-time because of a health condition or a disability, then you may be eligible for financial aid and disability benefits from the government. You could be eligible for:

    • Employment & Support Allowance
    • Personal Independence Payment
    • Attendance Allowance
    • Universal Credit
    • Various other forms of financial help, such as exemption from Vehicle Tax, VAT Relief or Disabled Facilities Grants

Some people will be entitled to additional benefits, as explained in part 2 of this chapter.

In this article we will explore everything you need to know about these benefits. We will explain who is eligible for the different benefits available, how much people can expect to receive, how to apply, what is the maximum amount that people can receive and, also, how disability benefits have changed in recent years.

Employment & Support Allowance

Here’s what you need to know about Employment and Support Allowance:
  • Employment and Support Allowance is a form of financial aid for those whose health condition or disability makes it impossible or difficult for them to work.
  • Previously, people were able to receive either contribution-based or income-based Employment and Support Allowance. These have been scrapped and now there is only one benefit available, known as ‘new style’ Employment and Support Allowance.
  • You can only apply for ‘new style’ Employment and Support Allowance if you have worked , either as an employee or as self-employed, within the last 3 years and have made enough National Insurance contributions.
  • The amount you receive mainly depends on the severity of your disability, but can also vary according to your circumstances.
  • You can apply online and will need to have a Work Capability Assessment to gauge how much your condition affects your ability to work.If you receive Employment and Support Allowance, you can work up to a certain income level and number of hours without it affecting your payment. Usually if you work less than 16 hours per week and earn less than £140, you will still be eligible for ESA.

What is Employment Support Allowance?

Employment & Support Allowance (ESA) is a disability benefit given to those who are ill and/or disabled and are either incapable of working or can only work a certain number of hours because of their health condition. You can apply for Employment and Support Allowance if you are unemployed, or if you are employed or self-employed for a limited number of hours per week. If you meet the criteria and you are able to prove that your disability affects your ability to work, then you will be able to make a claim.

Recently, some people who were receiving other benefits such as Income Support or Disability Living Allowance were transferred onto Employment and Support Allowance as part of the government’s overhaul of the benefits system.

The amount you receive depends on:

  • The stage you are at in the assessment process
  • Any pension you receive
  • Your age
  • Your ability to return to work

To qualify for Employment & Support Allowance, you must:

  • Have a disability or health condition which affects the amount that you can work.
  • Have worked as an employee or as self-employed within the last 3 years and made enough National Insurance contributions. If you have received National Insurance credits they will also count. If you are currently working, you will need to have made enough National Insurance contributions within the last 3 years.
  • Be under the State Pension Age
  • Not be getting Statutory Sick Pay or Jobseeker’s Allowance.
  • Not be working more than 16 hours or earning more than £140 per week.
The Severe Disablement Allowance has been replaced by Employment & Support Allowance - Cashfloat The Severe Disablement Allowance has been replaced by Employment & Support Allowance - Cashfloat

Like Jobseeker’s Allowance, there are two types of ESA. Contribution-based ESA is based on the Class 2 National Insurance payments you have paid while you can receive Income-based ESA on its own or to top up a low income if you work part-time and/or receive a low salary.

How to Claim Employment & Support Allowance

You can apply for ESA online. During the first part of your application, you will find out if you are eligible and then, afterwards, you can finalise your claim.

You will need to supply the following information with your application:

  • Your National Insurance number.
  • Your bank or building society account number (or those of someone you trust to take the payment for you).
  • The date that your Statutory Sick Pay will end if you are getting it.
  • Your GP’s name, address and phone number
  • Details of any income that you have.

What Happens After you Apply?

After you make your application, your claim will be assessed. This normally takes 13 weeks and during this time, you will receive the assessment rate of payment. After your claim is assessed you will be placed in 1 of 2 groups, according to your ability to work. If you are deemed to be able to return to work in future, you will be put into the work-related activity group. If you’re unable to return to work, you’ll be put into the support group and will receive an extra allowance.

Most applicants will receive the standard amount, both during the assessment period and after they are placed in a group. Deductions are generally only made for people who receive a pension. If you receive a weekly pension of more than £85, before tax, you’ll get a reduced rate of ESA.

Those in the work-related activity group receive less than those in the support group. If you are placed in the support group, you may also be eligible for the enhanced disability premium or the severe disability premium.

Your Work Capability Assessment

During your assessment for Employment and Support Allowance, you must undergo a Work Capability Assessment. This will ascertain to what extent your disability or illness affects your ability to work. Normally, this involves completing a ‘capability for work questionnaire’ and a medical assessment with a healthcare professional from the Assessment Advisory Service. If you are in hospital or you have a terminal illness, you won’t need to have a Work Capability Assessment.

How much will I receive?
Assessment Rates (For up to 13 weeks after claim)
AgeStandard amount
Under 25£58.90
25 & over£74.35
After 13 weeks, Employment & Support Allowance payments:
Group AllocationStandard Amount
Work-related group £74.35
Support group £113.55
Supplementary payments (for the support group):
Enhanced Disability Premium£17.10
Severe Disability Premium £66.95
The ESA Work-Related Activity Group

If you are put in the work-related activity group, you will have an initial interview with your work coach at Jobcentre Plus. During this, they will learn more about your circumstances, help you with your work goals and establish what support is available for you to help you find a job. You will also need to agree to carry out work-related activity after the interview. Afterwards, you may need to return for further interviews and you will have to carry out the work-related activity that you agreed to do during the interview.

Your ESA can be reduced – or even stopped – if you do not go to job interviews or do the work-related activities that you agreed to do with your work coach. If you miss an interview or an appointment you will normally receive a ‘sanction letter’. If there was a good reason that you were unable to do any work-related activities, you should explain this to your work coach.

The payment for being in the Employment and Support Allowance work-related activity group will continue indefinitely as long as you meet the criteria to be in the group.

Claiming If You Have A Job: ‘Permitted Work’

Your ESA payments are not affected if you earn up to £140 per week doing any type of work and work less than 16 hours. You can work more than 16 hours in certain types of work, as long as you don’t earn more than £140. This must be work in which you are supervised by someone from a local council or voluntary organisation, or work done as part of a treatment programme done under medical supervision. You can work more than 16 hours in any type of work, as long as you don’t earn more than £20.

The Employment and Support Allowance Support Group

If you are put in the Employment and Support Allowance support group, you will not be expected to attend interviews with a work coach and you will not be expected to carry out work-related activity. As long as your disability or health condition qualifies you to be in the support group, you will be considered to be severely limited in your ability to work.

The payment for being in the Employment and Support Allowance support group will continue indefinitely as long as you meet the criteria to be in the group.

Carrying out ‘Permitted Work’ if you are in the Support Group

If your health condition improves while you are in the support group and you would like to begin doing some work it is important that you notify the Department for Work and Pensions that your circumstances have changed. A change in your health, which enables you to return to work will, most likely, mean that you will be moved into the work-related activity group and will only be eligible for the rate that people receive in this group.


Personal Independence Payment

Here’s what you need to know about Personal Independence Payment:
  • You can receive Personal Independence Payment if you have extra costs because of a disability or a long-term health condition.
  • You can receive Personal Independence Payment whether you work or you are unemployed.
  • It consists of 2 parts: a Daily Living part and a Mobility part. You may be able to receive either one or both parts.
  • The rate that people can receive varies from £23.60-£151.40 per week depending on how their condition affects them.
  • You will normally need to have an assessment from a health professional in order to receive Personal Independence Payment.
  • You can receive Personal Independence Payment at the same time as you receive Employment and Support Allowance.

What is Personal Independence Payment?

The Personal Independence Payment is state financial aid given to anyone who has long-term ill-health or a disability and needs help with the extra costs associated with their condition. It is available to people who are in work or unemployed. The money is tax-free and paid into your bank account every four weeks.

You are assessed for Personal Independence Payment on two factors: ‘daily living’ (how easily you can carry out daily routines, such as cooking and cleaning) and ‘mobility’ (how independent you are in getting around, both in and outside of the home.) Payments are made as ‘parts’ for each factor. You might get payment for one or both parts.

To be eligible for Personal Independence Payment, you must:

  • Be aged between 16 and the state pension age.
  • Have a long-term health condition or disability, which causes difficulties in daily living and/or mobility.
  • Have had these difficulties for at least three months and expect them to last for at least nine months more.
  • Live in England, Scotland or Wales and meet other residency requirements. While the benefit is the same in Northern Ireland, the process for applying is slightly different.
The Disability Living Allowance  is no longer given to new claimants unless they are under age 16 - Cashfloat The Disability Living Allowance  is no longer given to new claimants unless they are under age 16 - Cashfloat

Personal Independence Payment was introduced in 2012 to replace Disability Living Allowance. Disability Living Allowance is no longer being given to new claimants unless they are under the age of 16. Anyone who made a previous claim for Personal Independence Payment and was born on or before April 5th 1948 will continue to receive it indefinitely. Otherwise, people who are already receiving it will be asked, by the government, to move onto Personal Independence Payment. New claimants, over the age of 16, who would previously have qualified for Disability Living Allowance, should apply for Personal Independence Payment instead.

How to Apply for PIP

The easiest way to claim for Personal Independence Payment disability benefits in England, Wales and Scotland is to call the Department for Work & Pensions (DWP) on 0800 917 2222. You will be sent a form called ‘how your disability affects you’, as well as notes to help you fill it in. You should return this by post to the address on the form.

When making a claim, you will be expected to supply all your personal details, your doctor or health worker’s name and information about any time spent in a hospital or care home.

For people who are terminally ill, the application process is slightly easier and payments are usually received within 2 weeks. People who are not expected to live more than 6 months should make an application for Personal Independence Payment and ask their doctor or another healthcare professional to complete form DS1500. It is possible for someone else to make the claim on their behalf and the process is often smoother, with a face to face consultation rarely required.

The Assessment for Personal Independence Payment

An independent healthcare professional will assess you to determine how much you are affected by your condition. Rather than receiving a set amount for a specific condition, applicants are assessed according to how much their condition affects them personally. Most likely, you will need to have a face-to-face consultation. You will be sent a letter explaining why it is needed and where to go to receive it.

How you are Assessed

At your assessment, the healthcare professional will give you a score based on your level of disability. You will receive one score for the ‘daily living’ part of Personal Independence Payment and one for the ‘mobility’ part.

For each part you will be awarded points according to how able you are to carry out various activities, such as feeding yourself, and how much help you need in doing so. The higher the score, the more support you require. For each part, if you receive between 8 and 11 points, you will receive the standard amount and if you score 12 or higher, you will receive the enhanced amount.

How much Personal Independence Payment will I receive?
Daily Living Part:
Standard £59.70
Enhanced £89.15
Mobility Part:
Standard £23.60
Enhanced £62.25

The DWP will make a decision about whether you are eligible for Personal Independence Payment based on your assessment, your application and any other supporting evidence. You will usually be informed of their decision three weeks after your assessment. If you disagree with the results of your assessment, you are able to make a challenge.

FAQs about Employment and Support Allowance and Personal Independence Payment

What happens if my assessment period for Employment & Support Allowance takes longer than 13 weeks?
If the assessment period lasts longer than 13 weeks, then your payment will be back-dated.

How long can I receive Employment and Support Allowance for?
Employment and Support Allowance lasts a year for people in the work-related activity group. Normally, those people will not be able to continue getting any payments after that time, unless their condition worsens to the point that they are moved into the support group. There is no time limit for people who are in the support group.

What happens if the Work Capability Assessment judges that I am capable of working?
If you disagree with the decision reached in your work capability assessment, you can make a challenge against it. If you are unsuccessful, you can normally only reapply for Employment and Support Allowance if your current condition gets worse or if you have to claim for a new condition.

Can I do voluntary work if I receive Employment and Support Allowance?
Doing voluntary work usually does not affect your Employment and Support Allowance payment, but you should still report this to Jobcentre Plus or your work coach.

Can I receive Personal Independence Payment if I am terminally ill?
Yes. You will receive the enhanced daily living rate of Personal Independence Payment if your expected life span is no longer than six months and you can also receive the mobility rate according to your needs. When applying, call the Department for Work & Pensions and then get your doctor or another healthcare professional fill in the DS1500 form. Claims are usually processed more quickly for people with a terminal illness.



Attendance Allowance

Here’s what you need to know about Attendance Allowance:
  • Attendance Allowance is for people who are over the state pension age and have a physical and/or mental disability which is severe enough for them to require help with their care, or supervision.
  • The amount you receive will depend on how much care you need.
  • If you qualify for Attendance Allowance, you may also be able to get extra Pension Credit, Housing Benefit or Council Tax Reduction.
  • To apply, you can download or call for the Attendance Allowance claim form. A healthcare professional might need to assess you as part of your application.

Once you reach the state pension age, you are no longer eligible to receive Personal Independence Payment. People who receive Personal Independence Payment and have reached the state pension age or new claimants over the state pension age should apply for Attendance Allowance instead. This disability benefit is provided to help people with their personal care if they are physically and/or mentally disabled. The amount that people receive depends on the level of care they require. If you qualify for Attendance Allowance, you may also become entitled to other disability benefits, ushc as extra Pension Credit, Housing Benefit or Council Tax reduction.

When you reach the pension age, you will also normally lose your eligibility for Employment and Support Allowance. Where Attendance Allowance replaces Personal Independence Payment for people over the state pension age, the state pension and other benefits those people receive can act as a replacement for Employment and Support Allowance.

To be eligible for Attendance Allowance, you must:

  • Be over the state pension age and have a physical and/or mental disability.
  • Have a disability which is severe enough to require help caring for yourself or supervision, to prevent you from being a danger to yourself or others.
  • Have already needed help or supervision for at least 6 months. You will need to provide evidence of this, however, a medical diagnosis is not necessarily required.
  • Be in Great Britain when you make your claim (with some exceptions)
  • Have been in Great Britain for 2 of the last 3 years.
  • Be a habitual resident of Great Britain and not subject to immigration control.

How to Claim Attendance Allowance

You should download the Attendance Allowance application form with its explanatory notes and send the completed application to the address given on the form. Alternatively, you can call the Attendance Allowance helpline on 0800 731 0122. Your allowance may be back-dated to the date of your claim. This is usually the date they received your form, or the date you called the enquiry line (as long as you return the form within six weeks.)

For people who are terminally ill, the application process is slightly easier and applications are usually processed more quickly (with a decision usually reached within 2 weeks). People who are not expected to live more than 6 months should make an application for Attendance Allowance and ask their doctor or another healthcare professional to complete form DS1500. It is possible for someone else to make the claim on their behalf and the process is often smoother, with a face to face consultation rarely required.

The Assessment for Attendance Allowance

You may be asked to go to an assessment with a healthcare professional. For Attendance Allowance, if you are able to prove that you have a qualifying physical and/or mental disability, you will normally only need to go for an assessment if it is unclear how much your disability affects you. They will send you a letter telling you where to go, why you need an assessment and what you should bring with you.

How much Attendance Allowance will I receive?
Lower rate £59.70 weekly (For frequent help/constant supervision during the day, or for supervision at night)
Higher rate £89.15 (For help/supervision during both day and night, or for the terminally ill.)
FAQs about Attendance Allowance

If I receive Attendance Allowance, what changes in circumstances should I report to the Department for Work & Pensions?
Changes in your circumstances can affect the amount of Attendance Allowance that you are eligible for. You should call the Attendance allowance helpline if there is a change in your condition, a change in the amount of help you need, if you go into a hospital or a care home, if you leave the country for more than 4 weeks, if you go to prison, if you change your name, address or bank details, if you want to stop receiving Attendance Allowance or if your doctor’s details change.

What will happen if I don’t report a change in my circumstances?
If the Department for Work and Pensions are unaware of changes to your circumstances, you will normally have to repay any money that you received without being eligible for it. You could also be taken to court and might have to pay a fine of £50.

What should I do if I am unhappy with the decision made after my assessment for Attendance Allowance?
There is an appeal procedure if you are unhappy with the amount of help you are awarded with by the Department for Work and Pensions. To support your appeal, you should collect and supply other evidence about how your disability or illness affects you. If you are unsuccessful in your appeal, you can appeal to the Social Security and Child Support Tribunal.

Does Attendance Allowance cover mobility needs?
No. Attendance Allowance only includes help with personal care.

Can I receive Attendance Allowance if I am terminally ill?
Yes. If you are terminally ill ( you are medically not expected to live more than six months), you can apply and also ask your doctor or a healthcare professional to complete form DS1000. Claims are usually processed more quickly and someone else can apply on your behalf.



Universal Credit

If you qualify for Universal Credit and you have a disability or a health condition which prevents you from working, you can receive extra support on top of the standard allowance. Universal Credit is available for people who are over 18 and below the state pension age, with some exceptions for 16-17 year olds. You can get Universal Credit at the same time as getting Employment and Support Allowance and Personal Independence Payment. In many cases, if you are already receiving Employment and Support Allowance or Personal Independence Payment this will automatically qualify you for extra payments under Universal Credit.

Here’s what you need to know about Universal Credit:

  • You may be eligible for Universal Credit if you are unemployed or on a low income (usually an income of less than £140 per week).
  • You may also be eligible if you are between 18 and the state pension age (with some exceptions for 16-17 year olds), if you live in the UK and if you and your partner have less than £16,000 in savings between you.
  • People who qualify for Universal Credit can receive up to £409.89 per month, as an individual claimant. On top of this, if they have a disability or a health condition, Under Universal Credit they can receive up to £341.92 as an extra payment to help cover the costs of their illness or disability.
  • If you qualify for Employment and Support Allowance, Personal Independence Payment or other benefits because you are ill or disabled, you can receive these payments on top of your Universal Credit payment.
  • Universal Credit can also provide support (of up to £162.92) for people who care for someone with an illness or a disability.

How to Apply for Universal Credit

Most people who are unemployed or work less than 16 hours per week will be able to receive Universal Credit. Your eligibility and the amount that you receive depends on your circumstances. You can use a benefits calculator to see if you are eligible and how much you could receive.

In order to claim, normally you have to be over 18 years of age, although in some circumstances 16 and 17 year olds can apply. Either you or your partner must be below the state pension age and you and your partner must have less than £16,000 in savings between you. If you have a partner and you both live in the same household, you will have to make a joint claim. If they are employed their earnings will be taken into consideration and this will affect the amount that you can claim.

Applications for Universal Credit can be made online. During your application you will need to provide:

  • Your bank or building society account details (or those of someone you trust to take the payment).
  • Your email address and proof of your identity.
  • Information about your housing costs.
  • Details of any income you receive and any savings that you have. If you have a partner and you live with them, you will have to provide details of their income and savings.
  • Information about your disability or illness.
  • Details of any other benefits you receive.
You can get up to £341.92 as an  extra payment with Universal Credit to help cover the costs. You can get up to £341.92 as an  extra payment with Universal Credit to help cover the costs. Cashfloat

Applying for Extra Payments for Sickness or Disability

During your application for Universal Credit you will be asked to provide information about any illnesses or disabilities that you have. If you qualify for Universal Credit and you have any illnesses or disabilities, you may be entitled to receive extra payments on top of the standard monthly allowance.

If, during your application, the Department for Work and Pensions believe that your illness or disability may entitle you to extra payments, you will be asked to complete the Universal Credit capability for work questionnaire (form UC50). Following your submission of this form, you may be called in for a work capability assessment. As with other disability benefits, this may involve an appointment with a healthcare professional who will make an assessment of how much your disability limits your ability to work.

For people with a terminal illness, the process is usually easier and payments can be received more quickly. New claimants for Universal Credit, who have a terminal illness will be able to declare this in their application. Payments are usually received more quickly and another person will be able to make the claim on their behalf.

Outcome of your Application for Extra Sickness or Disability Payments

If you have already had a work capability assessment for another benefit, such as Employment and Support Allowance or Personal Independence Payment, you may not need to have another one. If this is the case, you may automatically begin to receive extra payments on top of your standard Universal Credit Allowance for your disability or illness. Many people who have previously been assessed as having limited capability for both work and work related activity will automatically qualify for extra payments. For people who have previously been assessed as having just limited capability for work, the process is slightly more complicated.

If you have not previously had a work capability assessment you will, most likely, be required to undergo a work capability assessment. This usually involves an assessment from a healthcare professional from the Assessment Advisory Service, who will assess how much your disability or illness affects your ability to work.

Following your work capability assessment, you will be placed in 1 of 3 groups. You will either be deemed to be fit for work, to have limited capability for work or to have limited capability for both work and work related activity.

If you are deemed to be fit for work, you will not receive any extra payments for sickness or disability. If you are deemed to have limited capability for work, normally you will not receive any extra payments for sickness or disability. This is because, although you cannot work, you are deemed as being capable of looking for work and beginning work in the future. If you are deemed to have limited capability for both work and work related activity, you will receive the maximum extra monthly allowance.

There is an exception made for people who were previously assessed as having just limited capability for work and have been receiving another benefit for this, since before 3rd April 2017. These people will receive a reduced extra monthly allowance for their sickness or disability.

How Much will I Receive?

Standard Universal Credit Allowance
Circumstances of claimantStandard monthly allowance
Single and under 25 £342.72
Single and over 25£409.89
A couple both aged under 25£488.59 (to be shared)
A couple and either person is over 25£594.04 (to be shared)
Extra Payments on top of the standard allowance for illness or disability
If you have limited capability for both work and work-related activity
All applicants£341.92
If you qualify for support for having just limited capability for work
All applicants£128.25

Other Help for the Disabled in the UK

Did you realise that if you are disabled or have an illness, there are other types of support that you can receive on top of Personal Independence Payment, Attendance Allowance, Employment & Support Allowance and Universal Credit? Things like VAT relief, vehicle tax exemption and disabled facilities grants could ensure that you have a better quality of life and can afford to buy whatever would make your life easier, without resorting to a payday loan to cover the cost.

In England, you can receive a disabled facilities grant of up to £30,000 if you need to adapt your home in order to accommodate your disability. Many people will be entitled to free public transport and won’t have to pay VAT on the cost of payments they have to make because of their disability.

Help with Transport and Vehicles

There are various ways the government can help you to cover the cost of transport, whether you use public transport or if you drive.

Community and Public Transport

Many disabled people will be entitled to a disabled person’s railcard and free bus passes. You may also be able to receive help from their local council through dial-a-ride or taxi schemes.

Vehicle Tax Exemption or Reduction

You can apply for exemption from paying vehicle tax if you have the enhanced mobility rate for Personal Independence Payment or have a 50% reduction if you have the standard mobility rate. Receiving other benefits such as Disability Living Allowance may also qualify you for exemption from paying vehicle tax. You can apply for this when you renew your vehicle tax. Make sure that you register the vehicle in the name of the disabled person or the name of their nominated driver. VAT relief for disabled people applies to adaptations made to vehicles in order to accomodate a person’s disability. If you need your vehicle adapted to suit your needs, you may not need to pay any VAT on this.

If you are disabled and on a low income, you  can get additional benefits - Cashfloat If you are disabled and on a low income, you can get additional benefits - Cashfloat

The Motability Scheme

The motability scheme exists to help people with an illness or disability to lease cars, powered wheelchairs and scooters. To be eligible you will need to be getting the enhanced rate of payment for the mobility component of Personal Independence Payment or another qualifying benefit.

Blue Badge Parking

People with severe walking difficulties are entitled to become blue badge holders, which provides a range of parking benefits.

Help with the Home and Housing

Disabled Facilities Grants

If you need to make adaptations to your home in order to accommodate your disability, you can receive a grant from the government in order to carry out the work. Any money received will have no affect on your other benefits. In England you can receive up to £30,000, in Wales you can receive up to £36,000 and in Northern Ireland you can receive up to £25,000. Disabled facilities grants are not available in Scotland, although other support is available.

Council Tax Reductions

People with an illness or disability may be entitled to a reduction in their council tax. Those with a severe mental impairment, such as dementia, are exempt from paying council tax and if they live with someone else they are entitled to a reduction in their council tax. People who have other disabilities may be entitled to a reduction in council tax if they live in a larger property than they would otherwise live in because of their disability. Under the Disabled Council Tax Band Reduction Scheme, those people will be able to have their council tax band reduced to the valuation band below the one they are currently in.

VAT Relief for the Disabled

Another disability benefit includes VAT relief on certain goods. Speciality items that you need because of your disability and domestic adaptations that you need may be exempt from VAT. Example items include stair lifts, alarms, adjustable beds, wheelchairs and so on. The cost of installation, maintenance and any accessories are also free of VAT.

Television License Discount

People who are registered blind or have a severe sight impairment are entitled to a 50% reduction in the cost of their TV license.

Summary of Disability Benefits

If you live in the UK, you are entitled to disability benefits if you are unable to work because of your disability. However, it can be difficult to know just what you are able to receive. At Cashfloat, we don’t want you to lose out on money that is rightfully yours and have to take loans with no guarantor just because you didn’t know to apply for your benefits! We hope you now have all the information you need about the disability benefits you can claim if you are disabled or have an illness and are unable to work as a result.





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About The Author
Becky Hall
Becky never thought she would be a financial blogger. But Fate arranged that Becky had to put her accounting degree on the back burner right after she graduated with a first in Business and Accounting. While doing bookkeeping as a freelancer for private clients, Becky noticed how many cashflow problems can be solved with a little bit of education. Trying to keep her clients out of debt, Becky began writing resources which she distributed to clients. What began as writing advice for clients evolved into a passion and now Becky found her platform at Cashfloat. When she isn’t writing, calculating or budgeting, Becky can be found at her piano playing something classical.
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Cashfloat is a trading style of Western Circle Limited - Company Registration Number: 7581337. We are fully authorised and regulated by The Financial Conduct Authority. FCA full permission license: 714479. ICO Registration Number: Z3305234


* Cashfloat terms and conditions apply. Applicants must be 18 or over. All loans are subject to affordability, applicant verification and traditional credit checks via various national databases by Cashfloat responsible lending policy. In most cases, loan decisions may take up to 30 minutes during office working hours. If your bank does not support Faster Payments, funds will be sent to your account the same day as approval so long as you’re approved by 16:30.


*Money will funded to your bank within 1 hour of approval - Mon-Fri during working hours.


Representative example: Borrow £700 for 6 months. 1st monthly repayment of £168.45, 4 monthly repayments of £224.60, last monthly repayment of £112.20. Total repayment £1,179.05. Interest rate p.a. (fixed) 185.39%. Representative APR 611.74% Our APR includes all applicable fees. Daily interest is capped at 0.793%.


Warning: Late repayment can cause you serious money problems. For help, go to moneyhelper.org.uk